Stylus Not Included with Best Buy Exclusive WiFi HTC Flyer

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If you are planning on picking up the WiFi-only HTC Flyer when it lands exclusively at Best Buy on May 22nd, be prepared to plop down an additional $79.99 if you want the full experience. The HTC Digital Stylus is not included in the $499 price tag of the Flyer, but pricing for the accessory that allows you to screen-shot, annotate, and doodle all over your tablet has been confirmed.

Seeing as it is one of the key differentiating features between the Flyer and other tablets on the market, we’d guess many had included the stylus in their purchasing plans. To get HTC’s slate and their digital pen the price now reaches more towards $500. Worth it for the non-Honeycomb 7-inch slate? You tell me.

[via AndroidCentral]

Stylus Not Included with Best Buy Exclusive WiFi HTC Flyer

This image has no alt text

If you are planning on picking up the WiFi-only HTC Flyer when it lands exclusively at Best Buy on May 22nd, be prepared to plop down an additional $79.99 if you want the full experience. The HTC Digital Stylus is not included in the $499 price tag of the Flyer, but pricing for the accessory that allows you to screen-shot, annotate, and doodle all over your tablet has been confirmed.

Seeing as it is one of the key differentiating features between the Flyer and other tablets on the market, we’d guess many had included the stylus in their purchasing plans. To get HTC’s slate and their digital pen the price now reaches more towards $500. Worth it for the non-Honeycomb 7-inch slate? You tell me.

[via AndroidCentral]

Stylus Not Included with Best Buy Exclusive WiFi HTC Flyer

This image has no alt text

If you are planning on picking up the WiFi-only HTC Flyer when it lands exclusively at Best Buy on May 22nd, be prepared to plop down an additional $79.99 if you want the full experience. The HTC Digital Stylus is not included in the $499 price tag of the Flyer, but pricing for the accessory that allows you to screen-shot, annotate, and doodle all over your tablet has been confirmed.

Seeing as it is one of the key differentiating features between the Flyer and other tablets on the market, we’d guess many had included the stylus in their purchasing plans. To get HTC’s slate and their digital pen the price now reaches more towards $500. Worth it for the non-Honeycomb 7-inch slate? You tell me.

[via AndroidCentral]

Stylus Not Included with Best Buy Exclusive WiFi HTC Flyer

This image has no alt text

If you are planning on picking up the WiFi-only HTC Flyer when it lands exclusively at Best Buy on May 22nd, be prepared to plop down an additional $79.99 if you want the full experience. The HTC Digital Stylus is not included in the $499 price tag of the Flyer, but pricing for the accessory that allows you to screen-shot, annotate, and doodle all over your tablet has been confirmed.

Seeing as it is one of the key differentiating features between the Flyer and other tablets on the market, we’d guess many had included the stylus in their purchasing plans. To get HTC’s slate and their digital pen the price now reaches more towards $500. Worth it for the non-Honeycomb 7-inch slate? You tell me.

[via AndroidCentral]

Jenga Wobbles Its Way into the Android Market, Get the Official Game Now

This image has no alt text

Along with the great 3D graphics today’s smartphone processor afford comes enhanced physics as well, and what better way to demonstrate the two in tandem than the freshly released Jenga. This is the Jenga we all grew up with — the one where you remove blocks from the bottom of a stack and move them to the top, all the while hoping the tower doesn’t collapse under its own awkward construction. In the official version of the game for Android developed by NaturalMotionGames the concept stays the same, though a new arcade mode with power-ups and upgrades has been added for enhanced single player fun.

What better way to break in my shiny new Motorola Droid X2 review unit and its dual-core Tegra 2 processor, right? The controls are clunky to say the least. Tapping the screen and dragging your finger is used both for controlling your view of the block tower and for actually moving around blocks themselves, so one must be careful when quickly flicking around the screen to get a better look at what’s going on. Once adjusted to the controls, gameplay is simple and fun. The physics seem a bit overly sensitive when moving blocks (but this may have more to do with controls), but I liked the added challenge.

NaturalMotionGames are the same people behind BackBreaker Football, so they know a thing or two about developing 3D experiences for today’s high-powered handsets. If you are a fan of Jenga, this app is for you. $2.99 in the Android Market now. J-J-J-Jenga!

Android Market Link: Jenga

Jenga Wobbles Its Way into the Android Market, Get the Official Game Now

This image has no alt text

Along with the great 3D graphics today’s smartphone processor afford comes enhanced physics as well, and what better way to demonstrate the two in tandem than the freshly released Jenga. This is the Jenga we all grew up with — the one where you remove blocks from the bottom of a stack and move them to the top, all the while hoping the tower doesn’t collapse under its own awkward construction. In the official version of the game for Android developed by NaturalMotionGames the concept stays the same, though a new arcade mode with power-ups and upgrades has been added for enhanced single player fun.

What better way to break in my shiny new Motorola Droid X2 review unit and its dual-core Tegra 2 processor, right? The controls are clunky to say the least. Tapping the screen and dragging your finger is used both for controlling your view of the block tower and for actually moving around blocks themselves, so one must be careful when quickly flicking around the screen to get a better look at what’s going on. Once adjusted to the controls, gameplay is simple and fun. The physics seem a bit overly sensitive when moving blocks (but this may have more to do with controls), but I liked the added challenge.

NaturalMotionGames are the same people behind BackBreaker Football, so they know a thing or two about developing 3D experiences for today’s high-powered handsets. If you are a fan of Jenga, this app is for you. $2.99 in the Android Market now. J-J-J-Jenga!

Android Market Link: Jenga

Jenga Wobbles Its Way into the Android Market, Get the Official Game Now

This image has no alt text

Along with the great 3D graphics today’s smartphone processor afford comes enhanced physics as well, and what better way to demonstrate the two in tandem than the freshly released Jenga. This is the Jenga we all grew up with — the one where you remove blocks from the bottom of a stack and move them to the top, all the while hoping the tower doesn’t collapse under its own awkward construction. In the official version of the game for Android developed by NaturalMotionGames the concept stays the same, though a new arcade mode with power-ups and upgrades has been added for enhanced single player fun.

What better way to break in my shiny new Motorola Droid X2 review unit and its dual-core Tegra 2 processor, right? The controls are clunky to say the least. Tapping the screen and dragging your finger is used both for controlling your view of the block tower and for actually moving around blocks themselves, so one must be careful when quickly flicking around the screen to get a better look at what’s going on. Once adjusted to the controls, gameplay is simple and fun. The physics seem a bit overly sensitive when moving blocks (but this may have more to do with controls), but I liked the added challenge.

NaturalMotionGames are the same people behind BackBreaker Football, so they know a thing or two about developing 3D experiences for today’s high-powered handsets. If you are a fan of Jenga, this app is for you. $2.99 in the Android Market now. J-J-J-Jenga!

Android Market Link: Jenga

Jenga Wobbles Its Way into the Android Market, Get the Official Game Now

This image has no alt text

Along with the great 3D graphics today’s smartphone processor afford comes enhanced physics as well, and what better way to demonstrate the two in tandem than the freshly released Jenga. This is the Jenga we all grew up with — the one where you remove blocks from the bottom of a stack and move them to the top, all the while hoping the tower doesn’t collapse under its own awkward construction. In the official version of the game for Android developed by NaturalMotionGames the concept stays the same, though a new arcade mode with power-ups and upgrades has been added for enhanced single player fun.

What better way to break in my shiny new Motorola Droid X2 review unit and its dual-core Tegra 2 processor, right? The controls are clunky to say the least. Tapping the screen and dragging your finger is used both for controlling your view of the block tower and for actually moving around blocks themselves, so one must be careful when quickly flicking around the screen to get a better look at what’s going on. Once adjusted to the controls, gameplay is simple and fun. The physics seem a bit overly sensitive when moving blocks (but this may have more to do with controls), but I liked the added challenge.

NaturalMotionGames are the same people behind BackBreaker Football, so they know a thing or two about developing 3D experiences for today’s high-powered handsets. If you are a fan of Jenga, this app is for you. $2.99 in the Android Market now. J-J-J-Jenga!

Android Market Link: Jenga

LauncherPro’s developer working on Windows Phone 7 music app for Android (Download)

While the platform might not be doing too well with consumers, Windows Phone 7 does have something going for it — and that’s its Metro UI. The OS  made a big splash last year when the it was released because of its unique, refreshing, and truly beautiful UI.

Metro UI moves beyond the realistic and plasticky look of iOS and Android, throwing all the chrome away and focusing on “typography and content” — and I love it for that. As does Google, the company seems to be heading in that direction with the Honeycomb UI as well.

Another Android fan that loves the Metro UI is Federico Carnales, developer of the popular LauncherPro app for Android. He’s currently working on a music app for Android that it’s an exact replica of Windows Phone’s. The app while still in alpha is already snappier than Android’s own music app; and as you can see in the video below, it performs and looks just like its Windows Phone’s counterpart.

At this point, we don’t know how Microsoft will take this news. They might take it as a compliment, or sue the pants off Federico. Either way, we applaud Mr. Carnales for taking the time to build this app. Hopefully, he won’t stop with the music app, and will bring the Windows Phone gallery, phone, and messaging apps to Android as well.

I’m a big fan of Federico’s LauncherPro, and if the alpha version of his music app is any indication, I’ll be an even bigger fan of “FedeMusic”. If you want to test drive — or even use it on a daily basis — Federico’s music app, you can download it here. The app should hit the Android Market in the near future, and I expect it to become very popular as soon as it does.

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LauncherPro’s developer working on Windows Phone 7 music app for Android (Download)

While the platform might not be doing too well with consumers, Windows Phone 7 does have something going for it — and that’s its Metro UI. The OS  made a big splash last year when the it was released because of its unique, refreshing, and truly beautiful UI.

Metro UI moves beyond the realistic and plasticky look of iOS and Android, throwing all the chrome away and focusing on “typography and content” — and I love it for that. As does Google, the company seems to be heading in that direction with the Honeycomb UI as well.

Another Android fan that loves the Metro UI is Federico Carnales, developer of the popular LauncherPro app for Android. He’s currently working on a music app for Android that it’s an exact replica of Windows Phone’s. The app while still in alpha is already snappier than Android’s own music app; and as you can see in the video below, it performs and looks just like its Windows Phone’s counterpart.

At this point, we don’t know how Microsoft will take this news. They might take it as a compliment, or sue the pants off Federico. Either way, we applaud Mr. Carnales for taking the time to build this app. Hopefully, he won’t stop with the music app, and will bring the Windows Phone gallery, phone, and messaging apps to Android as well.

I’m a big fan of Federico’s LauncherPro, and if the alpha version of his music app is any indication, I’ll be an even bigger fan of “FedeMusic”. If you want to test drive — or even use it on a daily basis — Federico’s music app, you can download it here. The app should hit the Android Market in the near future, and I expect it to become very popular as soon as it does.

No related content found.